gchange  > 气候变化事实与影响
DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1307736
Title:
Vehicular Traffic–Related Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure and Breast Cancer Incidence: The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP)
Author: Irina Mordukhovich; 1 Jan Beyea; 2 Amy H. Herring; 3; 4 Maureen Hatch; 5 Steven D. Stellman; 6 Susan L. Teitelbaum; 7 David B. Richardson; 1 Robert C. Millikan; 1* Lawrence S. Engel; 1 Sumitra Shantakumar; 8 Susan E. Steck; 9 Alfred I. Neugut; 6; 10 Pavel Rossner Jr.; 11; 12 Regina M. Santella; 11; Marilie D. Gammon1
Source Publication: Environmental Health Perspectives
ISSN: 0091-6842
Indexed By: SCI-E
Publishing Year: 2016
Volume: Volume 124, Issue:Issue 1
pages begin: 30
Language: 英语
Subject in Chinese: 碳氢化合物/烃类 ; 致癌物
Subject: HYDROCARBONS ; CARCINOGENS
English Abstract: Background: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants, known human lung carcinogens, and potent mammary carcinogens in laboratory animals. However, the association between PAHs and breast cancer in women is unclear. Vehicular traffic is a major ambient source of PAH exposure.

Objectives: Our study aim was to evaluate the association between residential exposure to vehicular traffic and breast cancer incidence.

Methods: Residential histories of 1,508 participants with breast cancer (case participants) and 1,556 particpants with no breast cancer (control participants) were assessed in a population-based investigation conducted in 1996–1997. Traffic exposure estimates of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), as a proxy for traffic-related PAHs, for the years 1960–1995 were reconstructed using a model previously shown to generate estimates consistent with measured soil PAHs, PAH–DNA adducts, and CO readings. Associations between vehicular traffic exposure estimates and breast cancer incidence were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression.

Results: The odds ratio (95% CI) was modestly elevated by 1.44 (0.78, 2.68) for the association between breast cancer and long-term 1960–1990 vehicular traffic estimates in the top 5%, compared with below the median. The association with recent 1995 traffic exposure was elevated by 1.14 (0.80, 1.64) for the top 5%, compared with below the median, which was stronger among women with low fruit/vegetable intake [1.46 (0.89, 2.40)], but not among those with high fruit/vegetable intake [0.92 (0.53, 1.60)]. Among the subset of women with information regarding traffic exposure and tumor hormone receptor subtype, the traffic–breast cancer association was higher for those with estrogen/progesterone-negative tumors [1.67 (0.91, 3.05) relative to control participants], but lower among all other tumor subtypes [0.80 (0.50, 1.27) compared with control participants].

Conclusions: In our population-based study, we observed positive associations between vehicular traffic-related B[a]P exposure and breast cancer incidence among women with comparatively high long-term traffic B[a]P exposures, although effect estimates were imprecise.
Related Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307736
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Document Type: 期刊论文
Identifier: http://119.78.100.177/globalchange/handle/2HF3EXSE/12173
Appears in Collections:气候变化事实与影响
气候变化与战略

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Affiliation: 1Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA; 2Consulting in the Public Interest, Lambertville, New Jersey, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, and 4Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA; 5Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; 6Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA; 7Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA; 8GlaxoSmithKline Inc., Singapore; 9Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA; 10Department of Medicine, and; 11Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA; 12Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague, Czech Republic

Recommended Citation:
Irina Mordukhovich,1 Jan Beyea,2 Amy H. Herring,et al. Vehicular Traffic–Related Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure and Breast Cancer Incidence: The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP)[J]. Environmental Health Perspectives,2016-01-01,Volume 124(Issue 1):30
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