globalchange  > 气候变化与战略
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1911099116
Title:
Predator-informed looming stimulus experiments reveal how large filter feeding whales capture highly maneuverable forage fish
Author: Cade D.E.; Carey N.; Domenici P.; Potvin J.; Goldbogen J.A.
Source Publication: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
ISSN: 0027-8424
Publishing Year: 2020
Volume: 117, Issue:1
pages begin: 472
pages end: 478
Language: 英语
Keyword: Attack kinematics ; Fish feeding ; Humpback whale ; Looming stimulus ; Predator/prey
Scopus Keyword: acceleration ; anchovy ; Article ; Cetacea ; controlled study ; deceleration ; forager ; foraging ; humpback whale ; hydrodynamics ; kinematics ; latent period ; locomotion ; nonhuman ; population dispersion ; predator ; prey capture ; priority journal ; stimulus response ; visual stimulation ; anatomy and histology ; animal ; biological model ; escape behavior ; evolution ; feeding behavior ; filtration ; fish ; humpback whale ; jaw ; krill ; organ size ; physiology ; predation ; time factor ; Animals ; Biological Evolution ; Escape Reaction ; Euphausiacea ; Feeding Behavior ; Filtration ; Fishes ; Humpback Whale ; Hydrodynamics ; Jaw ; Locomotion ; Models, Biological ; Organ Size ; Predatory Behavior ; Time Factors
English Abstract: The unique engulfment filtration strategy of microphagous rorqual whales has evolved relatively recently (<5 Ma) and exploits extreme predator/prey size ratios to overcome the maneuverability advantages of swarms of small prey, such as krill. Forage fish, in contrast, have been engaged in evolutionary arms races with their predators for more than 100 million years and have performance capabilities that suggest they should easily evade whale-sized predators, yet they are regularly hunted by some species of rorqual whales. To explore this phenomenon, we determined, in a laboratory setting, when individual anchovies initiated escape from virtually approaching whales, then used these results along with in situ humpback whale attack data to model how predator speed and engulfment timing affected capture rates. Anchovies were found to respond to approaching visual looming stimuli at expansion rates that give ample chance to escape from a sea lion-sized predator, but humpback whales could capture as much as 30–60% of a school at once because the increase in their apparent (visual) size does not cross their prey’s response threshold until after rapid jaw expansion. Humpback whales are, thus, incentivized to delay engulfment until they are very close to a prey school, even if this results in higher hydrodynamic drag. This potential exaptation of a microphagous filter feeding strategy for fish foraging enables humpback whales to achieve 7× the energetic efficiency (per lunge) of krill foraging, allowing for flexible foraging strategies that may underlie their ecological success in fluctuating oceanic conditions. © 2020 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
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被引频次[WOS]:6   [查看WOS记录]     [查看WOS中相关记录]
Document Type: 期刊论文
Identifier: http://119.78.100.158/handle/2HF3EXSE/164375
Appears in Collections:气候变化与战略

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Affiliation: Cade, D.E., Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, United States; Carey, N., Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, United States, Scottish Association for Marine Science, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, United Kingdom; Domenici, P., Istituto per lo studio degli impatti Antropici e Sostenibilità in ambiente marino, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, IAS-CNR, Torregrande, Oristano, 09170, Italy; Potvin, J., Department of Physics, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103, United States; Goldbogen, J.A., Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, United States

Recommended Citation:
Cade D.E.,Carey N.,Domenici P.,et al. Predator-informed looming stimulus experiments reveal how large filter feeding whales capture highly maneuverable forage fish[J]. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America,2020-01-01,117(1)
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