globalchange  > 影响、适应和脆弱性
DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13706
Title:
Asymmetric responses of primary productivity to precipitation extremes: A synthesis of grassland precipitation manipulation experiments
Author: Wilcox K.R.; Shi Z.; Gherardi L.A.; Lemoine N.P.; Koerner S.E.; Hoover D.L.; Bork E.; Byrne K.M.; Cahill J.; Jr.; Collins S.L.; Evans S.; Gilgen A.K.; Holub P.; Jiang L.; Knapp A.K.; LeCain D.; Liang J.; Garcia-Palacios P.; Peñuelas J.; Pockman W.T.; Smith M.D.; Sun S.; White S.R.; Yahdjian L.; Zhu K.; Luo Y.
Source Publication: Global Change Biology
ISSN: 13541013
Publishing Year: 2017
Volume: 23, Issue:10
pages begin: 4376
pages end: 4385
Language: 英语
Keyword: aboveground net primary productivity ; belowground net primary productivity ; biomass allocation ; climate change ; grasslands ; meta-analysis ; root biomass
English Abstract: Climatic changes are altering Earth's hydrological cycle, resulting in altered precipitation amounts, increased interannual variability of precipitation, and more frequent extreme precipitation events. These trends will likely continue into the future, having substantial impacts on net primary productivity (NPP) and associated ecosystem services such as food production and carbon sequestration. Frequently, experimental manipulations of precipitation have linked altered precipitation regimes to changes in NPP. Yet, findings have been diverse and substantial uncertainty still surrounds generalities describing patterns of ecosystem sensitivity to altered precipitation. Additionally, we do not know whether previously observed correlations between NPP and precipitation remain accurate when precipitation changes become extreme. We synthesized results from 83 case studies of experimental precipitation manipulations in grasslands worldwide. We used meta-analytical techniques to search for generalities and asymmetries of aboveground NPP (ANPP) and belowground NPP (BNPP) responses to both the direction and magnitude of precipitation change. Sensitivity (i.e., productivity response standardized by the amount of precipitation change) of BNPP was similar under precipitation additions and reductions, but ANPP was more sensitive to precipitation additions than reductions; this was especially evident in drier ecosystems. Additionally, overall relationships between the magnitude of productivity responses and the magnitude of precipitation change were saturating in form. The saturating form of this relationship was likely driven by ANPP responses to very extreme precipitation increases, although there were limited studies imposing extreme precipitation change, and there was considerable variation among experiments. This highlights the importance of incorporating gradients of manipulations, ranging from extreme drought to extreme precipitation increases into future climate change experiments. Additionally, policy and land management decisions related to global change scenarios should consider how ANPP and BNPP responses may differ, and that ecosystem responses to extreme events might not be predicted from relationships found under moderate environmental changes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Funding Project: Thanks to B. Hungate and two anonymous reviewers for their insightful input. Also, we would like to thank all the principal investigators, graduate students, technicians, etc. who contributed to the precipitation experiments used in this analysis, thus making this study possible. We would like to acknowledge all the funding agencies supporting past, current, and future climate change experiments including DEB-1456597, DEB-1027319, ERC SyG-2013-610028 IMBALANCE-P, USDA NIFA-AFRI 2016-67012-25169, and the NSF Macrosystems Biology funded Extreme Drought in Grasslands (EDGE) project.
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被引频次[WOS]:50   [查看WOS记录]     [查看WOS中相关记录]
Document Type: 期刊论文
Identifier: http://119.78.100.158/handle/2HF3EXSE/60802
Appears in Collections:影响、适应和脆弱性

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Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, United States; School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States; Department of Biology & Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States; Department of Integrative Biology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service, Fort Collins, CO, United States; Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Department of Environmental Science and Management, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA, United States; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, United States; Department of Integrative Biology, Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University, Hickory Corners, MI, United States; Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Global Change Research Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic; Área de Biodiversidad y Conservación, Departamento de Biología, Geología, Física y Química Inorgánica, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Spain; CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CSIC-UAB, Catalonia, Bellaterra, Spain; CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain; College of Forestry, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, China; Environment and Parks, Government of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Facultad de Agronomía, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas Vinculadas a la Agricultura (IFEVA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, United States; Department of Biology, University of Texas, Arlington, TX, United States

Recommended Citation:
Wilcox K.R.,Shi Z.,Gherardi L.A.,et al. Asymmetric responses of primary productivity to precipitation extremes: A synthesis of grassland precipitation manipulation experiments[J]. Global Change Biology,2017-01-01,23(10)
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