gchange  > 气候减缓与适应
DOI: 10.1007/s10584-017-1950-z
Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85017241843
Title:
Evaluating opportunities for an increased role of winter crops as adaptation to climate change in dryland cropping systems of the U.S. Inland Pacific Northwest
Author: Stöckle C.O.; Higgins S.; Nelson R.; Abatzoglou J.; Huggins D.; Pan W.; Karimi T.; Antle J.; Eigenbrode S.D.; Brooks E.
Source Publication: Climatic Change
ISSN: 0165-0009
EISSN: 1573-1480
Indexed By: SCI ; SCI-E ; EI
Publishing Year: 2018
Volume: 146, Issue:2018-01-02
pages begin: 247
pages end: 261
Language: 英语
Keyword: Alternative rotations ; Crop modeling ; Global climate models ; Representative concentration pathways
Scopus Keyword: Agriculture ; Agronomy ; Carbon dioxide ; Climate models ; Crops ; Plants (botany) ; Adaptation to climate changes ; Crop model ; Dryland cropping systems ; Economic considerations ; Global climate model ; Long-term sustainability ; Regional opportunities ; Representative concentration pathways ; Climate change ; adaptive management ; agricultural diversification ; agricultural modeling ; agronomy ; climate change ; climate conditions ; climate modeling ; crop plant ; crop production ; crop rotation ; dryland farming ; economic conditions ; farming system ; global climate ; growth ; precipitation (climatology) ; sustainability ; transpiration ; wheat ; winter ; Pacific Northwest ; Triticum aestivum
English Abstract: The long-term sustainability of wheat-based dryland cropping systems in the Inland Pacific Northwest (IPNW) of the United States depends on how these systems adapt to climate change. Climate models project warming with slight increases in winter precipitation but drier summers for the IPNW. These conditions combined with elevated atmospheric CO2, which promote crop growth and improve transpiration-use efficiency, may be beneficial for cropping systems in the IPNW and may provide regional opportunities for agricultural diversification and intensification. Crop modeling simulation under future climatic conditions showed increased wheat productivity for the IPNW for most of the century. Water use by winter wheat was projected to decrease significantly in higher and intermediate precipitation zones and increase slightly in drier locations, but with winter crops utilizing significantly more water overall than spring crops. Crop diversification with inclusion of winter crops other than wheat is a possibility depending on agronomic and economic considerations, while substitution of winter for spring crops appeared feasible only in high precipitation areas. Increased weed pressure, higher pest populations, expanded ranges of biotic stressors, and agronomic, plant breeding, economic, technology, and other factors will influence what production systems eventually prevail under future climatic conditions in the region. © 2017, The Author(s).
Citation statistics:
被引频次[WOS]:12   [查看WOS记录]     [查看WOS中相关记录]
Document Type: 期刊论文
Identifier: http://119.78.100.177/globalchange/handle/2HF3EXSE/83828
Appears in Collections:气候减缓与适应
气候变化事实与影响

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Affiliation: Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, United States; Department of Geography, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, United States; Northwest Sustainable Agroecosystems Research, USDA-ARS, Pullman, WA, United States; Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, United States; Department of Applied Economics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States; Department of Plant, Soil and Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, United States; Department of Biological Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, United States

Recommended Citation:
Stöckle C.O.,Higgins S.,Nelson R.,et al. Evaluating opportunities for an increased role of winter crops as adaptation to climate change in dryland cropping systems of the U.S. Inland Pacific Northwest[J]. Climatic Change,2018-01-01,146(2018-01-02)
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